The Sixth Floor Museum at Dealey Plaza

On November 22, 1963, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was visiting Dallas, Texas. At approximately 12:30pm, as the Presidential motorcade made it’s way through the city, rifle shots rang out, and the area known as the grassy knoll would become a national historic landmark. The Presidential motorcade travelled north on […]

Life + Leisure Travel and Getaways Brian Webb

This article was published on December 2nd, 2012

On November 22, 1963, John Fitzgerald Kennedy, the 35th President of the United States, was visiting Dallas, Texas. At approximately 12:30pm, as the Presidential motorcade made it’s way through the city, rifle shots rang out, and the area known as the grassy knoll would become a national historic landmark.

The Presidential motorcade travelled north on Houston to Elm Street, then turned West on Elm. The area is called Dealey Plaza, and it was built in the 1930’s and named after George Bannerman Dealey. The plaza is located on Houston Street between Elm and Commerce. The grassy knoll is located on the north side of Elm Street.

Today, the plaza has many points of interest and plaques describing the events that took place. The exact location of the assassination on Elm Street is marked with a large white “X”.

Overlooking Dealey Plaza is the building famously known as the Texas School Book Depository, now known as the Dallas Country Administration Building and the home of the Sixth Floor Museum. It was built in 1901. This is the location where investigators found evidence they believe prove the fatal shots were fired.

The museum takes visitors through an audio tour, recounting the history leading up to the fateful day, chronicling and reconstructing the assassination events in great detail through film footage, photographs, and artifacts.

On the sixth floor, visitors can see the exact location where there sniper, accused Lee Harvey Oswald, was perched. The entire scene is preserved exactly as it appeared the day of the shooting.

The museum also presents the findings of the Warren Commission, addresses conspiracy theories, and the legacy of President JFK.

RELATED POSTS

7 travel essentials every gay traveler needs on their next vacation

September 6th, 2020

Brian Webb 0

How to use travel to find a partner

August 16th, 2020

Simon Elstad 0

10 Reasons Why You Should Travel Solo

August 9th, 2020

Simon Elstad 0

Join the Conversation

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *