New Years Mimosas

The tradition of ringing in the New Year with a toast of bubbly goes back decades. New Year’s parties with that special someone for a kiss at midnight, a gathering of friends at an elegant party, and a toast to upcoming year with peace, prosperity and good health, all come as part of the traditions. […]

Food + Drink Cocktail of the Week Brian Webb

This article was published on December 27th, 2013

New Years Mimosa featuring The Bub from Haywire Winery The tradition of ringing in the New Year with a toast of bubbly goes back decades. New Year’s parties with that special someone for a kiss at midnight, a gathering of friends at an elegant party, and a toast to upcoming year with peace, prosperity and good health, all come as part of the traditions.

No matter how you ring in 2014, there’s bound to be bubbles involved. There are so many different types from sparkling wines, from cava and bruts, to a dry Prosecco. There are lots of great bubbles that won’t have you breaking the bank over the holiday, but steer clear of the bottles under $10; they’ll leave you with a pounding headache. Stick to a quality mid-range bottle, like The Bub from Haywire Winery in the Okanagan Valley.

For New Year’s Day brunch, serving a New Years Mimosa is essential! A mimosa is really easy to make. It’s just a flute glass half filled with chilled bubbles and half filled with cold, fresh juice. The most common type of mimosa is orange.

For the best results, use a quality bottle of bubbly, like The Bub. You can use any kind of fruit juice, but for best results, make sure it’s fresh squeezed or fresh-made, and served cold. Remember, mimosas are half juice, and fresh juice will dramatically improve the flavour.

For the best results, first fill the flute glass with the bubbles, which will mix the cocktail when the juice is poured in. This also keeps from leavings a sticky ring around the top of the glass.

You can also kick-up a mimosa a notch by adding other fruit-flavoured liqueurs, like Grand Marnier to an orange mimosa. Get creative by mixing different types of fresh fruit juices, like strawberry and lemon, to make a refreshing and lively mimosa.

  • Chilled bubbly
  • Cold, fresh squeezed juice

Fill a flute glass half full of champagne. Pour in fresh fruit juice. Serve right away.

 

 

 

, , , , , , , ,

RELATED POSTS

Ginger Pear Bourbon Cocktail

September 13th, 2019

Brian Webb 0

Sparkling Peach Sunrise

September 6th, 2019

Brian Webb 0

Sazerac

August 30th, 2019

Brian Webb 0

Join the Conversation

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *