Advice for beginner runners on running injury free

People new to running, or those who do not run frequently, often complain that their shins hurt when they run. It usually comes when an untrained runner decides to go out and complete a 10k race and ends up with multiple running injuries and as a result, will hate running forever and swear that running […]

Health Running Brian Webb

This article was published on June 16th, 2014

Beginner Runners

Photo credit: Running Room

People new to running, or those who do not run frequently, often complain that their shins hurt when they run. It usually comes when an untrained runner decides to go out and complete a 10k race and ends up with multiple running injuries and as a result, will hate running forever and swear that running is bad on knees and joints. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

Before you say, “Hey, I’m going to run a 10k race”, two weeks before the race, don’t go out an run a fast 5k run as fast and as hard as you can. This is exactly how people get injured while running. It takes time to build up strength and endurance to run, and this is why the average or less-than-average people cannot go from zero training to being able to run a 10k in two weeks.

Think about it this way. If you don’t regularly go to the gym and lift weights, you would never walk into a gym and go directly to the bench press and try to do three sets of 15 reps with 90lbs on the bar. If you could do it, you know your chest muscles are going to hurt and you could get injured. It’s because your body isn’t used to that kind of activity.

The same logic applies to running as it does with weight training. You have to start off slowly and work your way up. Start off with short distances at slower speeds, and over time, increase both pace and distance.

You’ll never go from 0 to 10k in a day, but you will get there. Stick to a training program suited for your ability level.

Running is a discipline sport. This is why it takes marathoners 17 weeks to train for a marathon, assuming they can already run a 10k run non-stop. Marathon runners train long and hard, and do a variety of types of training runs to get to the 42.2km (26.6mi), finish line, injury free.

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