2015 is turning out to be a historic year for LGBT rights in the United States

President Barack Obama made the declaration in his State of the Union on Tuesday night that same sex couples right to marry is a civil right. Obama said that he’s seen something like gay marriage go from a wedge issue that drove Americans apart to a civil right that is now legal in states that […]

HomoCulture News and Politics Todd Hauptman

This article was published on January 22nd, 2015

President Barack Obama made the declaration in his State of the Union on Tuesday night that same sex couples right to marry is a civil right.

President Barack Obama made the declaration in his State of the Union on Tuesday night that same sex couples right to marry is a civil right. Obama said that he’s seen something like gay marriage go from a wedge issue that drove Americans apart to a civil right that is now legal in states that 7 out of 10 Americans call home.   This declaration by the President is only days after the Supreme Court announced that it would be making a decision in June whether the Fourteenth ament should force all of the states to protect marriage rights to straight and gay couples. Obama’s utterance of the words lesbian, bisexual, transgendered was for the first time in a President’s State of the Union.   All the milestones aside the battle continues in the United States for marriage and equal rights for gay and lesbian Americans.

The U.S. Supreme Court (USSC) announced on Friday that it will decide whether or not to allow same sex marriage in all 50 states, ending the debate once and for all.  This decision comes after USSC refused to hear appeals from rulings allowing same sex marriage in five states.  This decision could force the issue of LGBT right and same-sex marriage to be the defining moment of the 2016 presidential election.

The Supreme Court released a brief order stating that it will hear cases concerning marriage restrictions in Michigan, Ohio, Tennessee and Kentucky. The ruling will most likely come down by the end of June and it will determine whether 14 remaining state bans will be struck down.

The Court will answer two specific questions:

  1. Does the Fourteenth Amendment require a state to license a marriage between two people of the same sex?
  2. Does the Fourteenth Amendment require a state to recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed and performed out-of-state?

If the judges read the fourteenth constitutional amendment for its face value then equal protection including marriage and employment non-discrimination rights should be granted to all American citizens.  If the court decides that the answer to these two questions is yes then marriage rights for all are possible.
The question of marriage rights is not just be a debate about legal protections for same sex couples but it is a question of whether every person is truly created equal.  The answer is yes so maybe in June they will finally recognize it.  This is about love, come on.

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