Cork or screw?

There’s two identical bottles of wines on the table tonight. The only difference is that one has a cork and the other has a screw cap. Which bottle do you think is more expensive? Which would you choose? And why? While corks are the classic choice for a wine bottle, screw caps are rapidly growing […]

Food + Drink The Wine Files Brian Webb

This article was published on March 31st, 2015

wine3-jpegThere’s two identical bottles of wines on the table tonight. The only difference is that one has a cork and the other has a screw cap.

Which bottle do you think is more expensive? Which would you choose? And why?

While corks are the classic choice for a wine bottle, screw caps are rapidly growing popularity in recent years. So which is better: corks or screw caps?

As Jim Faulkner, winemaker of Mt. Boucherie Estate Winery explained to us, this question is like asking “Which came first, the chicken or the egg?” One could argue either side and still not know the answer. We’ve broken it down for you to be your own judge.

MB-Bottle-FamilyCORKS- Cons

  • Typically more expensive
  • More likely to be affected by cork taint (the wine becomes “corked”)
  • Cork quality may vary from batch to batch
  • Each cork “breathe” at different rate

CORKS- Pros

  • A natural and renewable resource
  • The traditional method of wine bottling
  • Longterm aging: A porous stopper to help wine age and develop its aroma

SCREW CAPS- Cons

  • Although recyclable, screw caps are not biodegradable
  • An association that screw caps means the wine is “cheap”

SCREW CAPS- Pros

  • No cork taint
  • Longterm aging is possible but slower than corks
  • Easy to open and resealable
  • Consistency in quality of screw caps

Overall-  It seems both corks and screw caps have their own pros and cons. Regardless of your stance on cork or screw caps, it can be agreed that both closures are good and keep wine inside the bottle. Cork is traditional. Screw cap is convenient. Neither cork nor screw cap should determine the quality of your wine. Instead, it’s the wine inside the bottle that matters more.

As Jim would say, “All I know is that if the wine has a cork in it somebody better have a corkscrew.”

What do you think? Are you a cork or screw cap supporter? Let us know below. 

 Tips on quality assurance for a BC wine.

This post is presented by Mt. Boucherie Family Estate Winery in West Kelowna, British Columbia. Visit Mt. Boucherie for a taste of Okanagan Wine Country. Bring a bag lunch or sign-up for a summer event, there’s a unique wine country experience to take home.

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One thought on “Cork or screw?

  1. Russell

    If you’re just interested in enjoying a wine, whether the bottle has a screw cap or cork no longer is a factor when making a tasting decision. If however you’re interested in not only a wine’s aroma and taste but the pleasure of a “fabulous” presentation, a corked bottle is still the winner.

    I’ve a long-term friend who’s much more knowledgeable than I about wine, with whom I often dine. It’s fun to see him interact with the server when a bottle of wine comes to the table.

    Reply